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#LoveYourBacklog Month 2021

Backlog: a word which sends a shiver down most gamers’ spines. That sense of unease experienced when looking at our pile of unplayed titles is a feeling we’re all familiar with – yet we just can’t stop adding entries to our library of games.

Does it really need to be this way though? What if our libraries were something to be celebrated rather than a source of shame? A mountain of games surely isn’t a cause for guilt, but a sign of how much you enjoy your hobby and having something suitable available for every gaming mood. That’s why Ellen from Ace Asunder and I are kicking off the #LoveYourBacklog event once again today – and this year, we’re extending it to the entire month of February to give everyone more time to show their backlog a little bit of affection.

If you’re up for joining in and feeling proud about your pile of video games, read on to find out how you can get involved.

Backlogged and proud of it

Show your backlog pride by selecting one of the following badges and displaying it on your blog throughout the month. If you’re open to others viewing your games list and possibly connecting with you to chat about gaming recommendations, feel free to add a link to your library to the image so we can check out your collection.


Do what bloggers do best

Declare your love for the backlog by writing a post about your game collection and publishing it before the end of February. Nominate unplayed or unfinished titles from your library for the first five questions below then give a shout-out to someone who has great taste in video games for the last one.

  • The effect that the 2020 apocalypse had on your backlog
  • The oldest game in terms of release date
  • A game you bought on day one, only to not play it
  • The game which has spent the most time on your backlog
  • The most recent addition to your library
  • The person responsible for adding the most entries to your backlog, due to their good recommendations

  • Participate in #MaybeInMarch

    The backlog appreciation isn’t over at the end of February as there’s more to come next month. You know that game nominated for the ‘most time on your backlog’ category above – well, how about attempting to complete it during March and then telling the community about the experience? This isn’t about getting a title off your to-play list however, but more about celebrating all the awesome releases which are part of it. Keep your eyes peeled for more details coming soon.

    Thank you to everyone who’d like to get involved with 2021’s #LoveYourBacklog Month. Now get out there and be proud of your backlog, because we’re looking forward to hearing all about your game collections.

    We’re taking part in GameBlast21 to support SpecialEffect, the gamers’ charity.
    Making a donation will bring you great loot, increase your XP by +100 and make you immune to fire.*
    (*Not guaranteed.)


    Kim View All

    Video game lover, Later Levels blogger and SpecialEffect volunteer. Big fan of wannabe pirates and fine leather jackets.

    47 thoughts on “#LoveYourBacklog Month 2021 Leave a comment

    1. I’ve realised that over the last year, I’ve stopped thinking about my backlog as a backlog or burden. Instead, I’m more thinking ahead, to a list of games in my future, with the “backlog” being possibilities for me to add to my schedule. Games that I never get to are fine – I have no obligation to play every good game – but I know that looking forward I will always have a fun game to fill my time. If I ever reach a point where I’ve finished all my planned games, I can just pick something else from the backlog.

      Perhaps my experiment with Final Fantasy helped prompt this shift. Knowing that I intended to play as many as possible meant thinking ahead about which order to play them, and fitting in other big upcoming games into that plan (mostly Assassin’s Creed, and then Hades snuck in over Christmas). The fact that all the games are older too, made it feel more like picking and choosing from gaming history rather than clearing titles off a backlog.

      I guess it also helps that games I own are spread across several media and places; on different consoles and in a mixture of physical and digital forms. I have nowhere to see my whole list of owned-but-unplayed games in one place so it’s easier to think of it as options rather than obligations.

      I’ve rambled on enough for this comment section… at what point should I stop writing these long comments and just make my own blog? Hmmmm

      Liked by 1 person

      • YES! Ghost Owl needs a Ghost Blog! Come join us over on the blogging dark side. 😄

        I think last year’s lockdown helped shift my backlog perspective to something that’s more like yours. There are definitely games in my library I’m never going to play (I’m not even sure how some of them ended up in there) and there’s no point in feeling guilty about it; there are so many others which look like they’re going to be more fun so that’s where I’m going to focus my time. Hopefully there’ll be a few more detective games coming up!

        Liked by 1 person

      • I’ll make you a deal: if you don’t do it this year, you’re never allowed to say the ‘M’ word on stream again. And I’m not talking about ‘March’. 😆

        Liked by 1 person

    2. I enjoyed doing this last year, and I’m excited to participate again this year! It makes my project from last year feel worth it.

      Like

    3. Ooer. Last year I knew almost immediately what game to pick. This year I’ll have to give it some thought.

      Not that there is any shortage of options! Just need to decide *which* one. 😉

      Like

    4. Had fun with this last year, looking forward to it again this year 👍🏻

      To clarify, are we counting just the games we have yet to play? or never finished? I tend to play just about every game I have for at least 30min-1hr but the list of games I own but have never finished is significantly longer…

      Like

      • I’ve just finished drafting my own post and decided to focus on my Steam library only to make things simpler for myself. I looked at every game there regardless of whether I’d played it or not, but used unfinished titles as answers for the third and fourth questions above.

        I think that was an overcomplicated way of me saying ‘you do you’. The most important part is to show some love for your library of video games rather than feeling guilty about how big it is. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    5. Sounds fun! Like my “To Be Watched” queue, my backlog keeps adding new games. It’s horrible for me because I’ve developed this “in the mood” type approach to everything. I have to be in the mood to watch a show, in the mood to play a type of video game, in the mood for pizza 🍕 (true story) 😂😂😂. This is a great way for me to finally get through some games on my list & steam queue so count me in!

      Like

    6. My backlog will never be conquered but this sounds like fun and now that I’ve entered all my games into Backloggery, I think I might be ready to actually show off that nightmare.

      Like

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